Coincidences. IN RECOVERY ??????????????????

A MUST READ    ARNIE
Hey Arnie

The last meeting I saw you guys at you were talking about coincidences.  This one is nuts,
 
A 24 year old kid comes into the room over a year ago.  He’s a smart kid (to smart) He has his own business has all of the answers. His girlfriend is pregnant and he can’t stop gambling.  He comes to a few meetings and disappears I text him a few times no answer and we don’t hear from him again.
 
He calls me yesterday.  Says he lost all of his contacts in his phone so he couldn’t call me sooner but that he met someone who gave him my number. He told me that in the year that he went out, he lost the business is losing his family and was ready to take his own life.  After he lost his business he started working making appliance service calls and anyone who paid cash he would take to gamble and then replace it.  He could not replace it this time. He’s also getting evicted etc.He decides to go on his last appliance service call of the day and then he had plans on how to off himself feeling his family would be better off with him dead than alive monetarily.
 
He gets to the service call and of all of the houses in Connecticut his last service call on the day he’s going to kill himself is the house of ======= a guy who has not made a bet in over 40 years from the Waterbury meeting. The kid never went to that room and had no idea who ===== was and ====== never met the kid.  It turns out when he gets there,there is nothing wrong with the refrigerator although there was when ======made the service call. As he’s leaving, ===== for some reason  mentions that he is in a 12 step program. As the kid is walking out the door he asks ===== what his addiction was and ===== mentions gambling.  The kid turns around and opens up to C===== We got him to a meeting and he is doing a lot better although he now has to fact the consequences.
 
What are the chances that not only does he go on his last service call to the guy with the recovery that =====has but that ===== mentions that he’s in the program to a service technician.
 
There IS some force out there that gives us opportunities to change our life when we lose our way.  
 
Best  ======
Malzberg | Arnie & Shelia Wexler discuss Arnie’s new book, “All Bets Are Off:” – YouTube

We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  
OUR NEW BOOK, GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT,
 ” ALL BETS ARE OFF”
BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON 

GAMBLING PROBLEM CALL (888) LAST BET ((888) 527-8238); WWW.ASWEXLER.COM

 

Do point spreads in newspapers/ media cause a proliferation of gambling?

 BY   ARNIE WEXLER

Do point spreads in newspapers/ media cause a proliferation of gambling?

You would not expect to open your local newspaper and get a price list of illegal drugs for sale; But that’s just about what you can get today when you open your local newspaper to the sports pages all over the country. True, you don’t see drug prices but you do see lines and point spreads on sporting events. Illegal drugs can’t be bought, legally in any state. You can’t place a legal bet in America, except in Las Vegas. I know it’s in because it sells newspapers.

There are ads in newspapers for 800 and 900 numbers that sell information to gamblers. Some of these ads read : “Get the game of the month free”, “We pick 75% winners”, “Last week we went 11 for 12″, and ” Get our lock of the week”.

I still can’t believe that newspapers carry ads from these so called handicappers, who are really scandicappers. It’s also interesting to note how often the information is incorrect.

I remember going to speak at Northwestern University a few years ago. That day I read in USA Today that Danny Sheridan wrote: “Northwestern was a million to one to win the Big 10”. Well, they did win the Big 10 and went to the Rose bowl. I also remember when the Dallas Morning News had a gorilla in the Dallas Zoo make football picks for them. The gorillas’ picks were doing better than the sports writers.

If you read the Sports Illustrated Story, written by Tim Layden in April of 1995 about gambling on the college campus, you now know what every youth on a college campus knows; gambling is running rampid on every college campus. Odds and point spreads have become a normal topic of conversation amongst these students. Gambling is as available as a can of beer or a pack of cigarettes and the student bookmakers get the lines they use straight out of their local newspapers.

In 1982 I was involved with trying to help a compulsive gambler who was an ex college star athlete. He owed $350,000 in gambling debts. It all started five years before when he played a football ticket for $5. No doubt the person providing the football ticket got the lines from their local newspaper

Picture the following scenario: A young man uses the lines and odds from his local newspaper and uses it to set up a bookmaking operation in the local town pub. A law officer comes in and arrests the bookmaker and players. The next day the headline in the paper says: ” John Doe Arrested For Bookmaking and Hank Smith Arrested For Illegally Betting”. Hypocrisy you say? The very newspaper that carried the lines, now is carrying this headline.

It seems to me that the message we are sending the youth of America is: Education is not necessary. You will be able to make your life fortune by pulling a slot machine , buying a lottery ticket or winning a bet on a game.

The NCAA understands this issue as they have discussed taking away press credentials at the Final Four, from newspapers that carry the lines.

Sports betting is a big problem for compulsive gamblers. I used to run a national hotline and 47% of the callers were sports bettors. Because compulsive gambling is an Impulse Control Disorder (as stated by the American Psychiatric Association), reading the lines in the newspaper can often trigger a gambling binge. Some recovering compulsive gamblers can’t buy a newspaper because of the anxiety it causes. I don’t see much difference between casinos serving free drinks to an alcoholic or newspapers putting lines out for compulsive gamblers to read.

Years ago only some newspapers carried the line. Now you can rarely pick up a newspaper that doesn’t. You also never heard electronic media discussing odds. Today it is common to hear such a discussion. Recently someone told me that they heard a commentator on a national TV football game say: “They covered the spread.”

• Years ago I was on a TV show with Howard Cossell (ABC Sports Beat). The topic was: Does the media encourage the public to gamble? Bobby Knight, Indiana basketball coach, said: “A newspaper who published point spreads should also publish names and addresses of services that render to prostitutes. They practically have the same legality in every one of our states, and I can’t see why one is any better than the other.” On the same show former baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn said: “Anything that encourages gambling on team sports bothers me. We all look hypocritical but than why are we putting up the odds unless we are trying to encourage it.” David Stern, NBA commissioner said: “We don’t want the weeks’ grocery money to be bet on the outcome of a particular sporting event.”

I would like to pose a few questions:

• Do point spreads in newspapers cause a proliferation of gambling?

• Do people see point spreads in the newspaper and think it is legal to place a bet?

• Does the media entice people to gamble?

• Does the media have any responsibility for the increase in numbers of compulsive gamblers in America?

• Does the media give the appearance that it promotes and condones gambling?

I think the responsible thing to do would be for newspapers to carry a public service message (Need Help For A Gambling Problem? Call: 1-888 LAST BET).

If you want to talk to arnie see info below

www.ASWexler.com

Arnie & Sheila Wexler Associates

Boynton Beach f FL

Arnie Wexler — aswexler@aol.com

Mobile: 954 501-5270

Malzberg | Arnie & Shelia Wexler discuss Arnie’s new book, “All Bets Are Off:” – YouTube

We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  
OUR NEW BOOK, GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT,
 ” ALL BETS ARE OFF”
BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON 

GAMBLING PROBLEM CALL (888) LAST BET ((888) 527-8238); WWW.ASWEXLER.COM

Sports betting what a bunch of Hippocrates

 

SEE OUR BOOK STEVE JACOBSON WRITES ABOUT  SPORTS AND GAMBLING
  BY ARNIE WEXLER 
 Sports betting what a bunch of  Hippocrates
JUST GIVE THEM A PEICE OF THE ACTION  !!!!
When DraftKings and FanDuel blitzed broadcasts with hundreds of millions of dollars in commercials at the beginning of the N.F.L. season last year, daily fantasy sports appeared to be a virtual cash machine. Each company was valued at more than $1 billion, and their investors included Major League Baseball, the N.B.A., and the N.F.L. owners Jerry Jones and Robert K. Kraft, as well as major media companies like NBC.
YOU HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY YOUNG KIDS ARE “GAMBLING” ON FANTACY SPORTS AND ARE ALREADY SEEKING HELP FOR GAMBLING ADDICTION .
Lets look at the history of sports betting In 1992, Senator Bill Bradley sponsored a bill that allowed sports betting to be grand fathered for the 3 or 4 states that had sports betting or previously had sports betting.  NO STATE ADDED SPORTS BETTING THEN.

Years ago, I was on a TV show with Howard Cossell (ABC Sports Beat). The topic was: Does the media encourage the public to gamble? David Stern, NBA commissioner said: “We don’t want the week’s grocery money to be bet on the outcome of a particular sporting event”

What a change===== On Dec. 11, 2009, commissioner David Stern told SI.com (the web site for Sports Illustrated) that legalized gambling on the NBA “May be a huge opportunity”

NOW  ==

when gambling suits the owners, it’s fine
N.B.A. Commissioner Adam Silver: Allow Gambling on Pro Games

We are also hearing that if we legalize sports betting we will stop the illegal sports betting in the state. We know it  can’t  true ! But what we do know is that if you add a new form of gambling more people try it and some of those people will become addicted. The proof to that test is that we heard that when lottery came into effect we were going to stop the illegal numbers games. In fact that never happened. One of the reasons are that you can still get credit from a “runner” when you play an illegal number, and today some stores that sell lottery tickets, still allow known players to run up a tab and pay when they can.  In fact, when I was the executive director of the Council on Compulsive Gambling of NJ (1986-1994) we did a survey that Gallup conducted for us. Two of the questions on the survey were: Have you ever played illegal numbers? 31% of the respondents said “yes”. Second question was: Do you play legal lottery in the state of NJ. 81% said “yes”.



We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  

GET OUR NEW BOOK  GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT
  ” ALL BETS ARE OFF”
  BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON 

 

 
 
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Famous athletes which suffer from gambling addiction by making bets on own matches

Famous athletes which suffer from gambling addiction by making bets on own matches

 

Athletes suffer from gambling addiction three times more often than the other people.

Federation of professional players (PPF) in England, conducted an anonymous survey of athletes on gambling and web betting.

Results of the survey, which was attended by 170 players and 176 cricketers were quite unexpected. 6.1% of respondents on the basis of the responses in the survey are classified as “addicted to live betting” – people suffering from gambling.

Sporting Chance Rehabilitation Center, in which were treated players such as Paul Gascoigne and Fernando Ricksen, reported that 70% of patients suffer from betting, and a large number of players took microloans to satisfy their passion.

According to Catherine Jankowski, practical psychologist, psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapist, there is nothing surprising in this fact.

– This phenomenon has two aspects, – said Catherine. – Firstly, athletes – people who have a special relationship with fortune. Passion, courage, desire to be on the top – particularly well developed in athletes who have achieved high results in sport. Impossible to play without courage. It is not surprising that they try their hand in this field. Fortune, luck is a lot of meaning for betting.

– Secondly, they are in the thick of things and have insider information on football clubs, players etc. -. Catherine said. – They are better informed than the average observer or bookmaker. Resist the temptation and not to use the information for winning bet is very difficulT

Malzberg | Arnie & Shelia Wexler discuss Arnie’s new book, “All Bets Are Off:” – YouTube

We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  
OUR NEW BOOK, GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT,
 ” ALL BETS ARE OFF”
BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON 

GAMBLING PROBLEM CALL (888) LAST BET ((888) 527-8238); WWW.ASWEXLER.COM

Celebrities who suffer from betting and gambling addictions

Celebrities who suffer from betting and gambling addictions

 

A simple ordinary man has many weaknesses and all kinds of addictions.

Someone successfully and simply deal with them, while others may be in vain to deal with addictions whole life. Among the most common addictions that are inherent to mankind is alcohol or drugs, smoking, sex and betting. However, the first four addictions almost always was a problem for humans, the betting become a big problem only in recent years. Gambling addiction, or as it is called gambling problem, it is not less dangerous than all the others, and sometimes its very difficult to get rid of it.

It became particularly acute in recent years, since the development of Internet technologies and the emergence of virtual casino and bookmaking establishments, now a resident of any country, who reached the age of 18 may play gambling games. However, it should be noted that the problem of gambling is not only common for ordinary people, gambling problem did not spared celebrities as well.

Among the celebs, suffering from gambling, I would like to highlight a few with very high addiction to the casino games and top bookmaking:

George Clooney. Despite the fact that Clooney began to bet in a casino (after Ocean’s 11 film), his passion for gambling developed into a real relationship. He even bought himself one of the casinos in Las Vegas.

Leonardo DiCaprio. Among all gambling games, Leo prefers to play poker, he very carefully for many years concealed his passion for gambling, but courageous and brave paparazzi found and pictured the actor’s passion for poker game.

Cameron Diaz. Cameron prefers to play card games, but it should be noted that all money she won – transfers to charity. Although this fact does not diminish her addiction to the card games.

Ben Affleck. Ben is a fan of illegal gambling clubs and bet on sports, and the paparazzi have noticed, that he prefer to visit such clubs at least twice a week.

As you can see, even the rich and famous people cry and suffer from gambling addiction, but no matter how harmless it is, this relationship – a serious disease that requires painstaking and skilled treatment.

What Do You Think?

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR HELP FOR GAMBLING ADDICTION ? CALL 888 LAST BET

Malzberg | Arnie & Shelia Wexler discuss Arnie’s new book, “All Bets Are Off:” – YouTube

We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.
OUR NEW BOOK GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT
” ALL BETS ARE OFF”

BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON See More

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We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  

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All bets are off: Losers, liars, and recovery from gambling addiction review PETER

All bets are off: Losers, liars, and recovery from gambling addiction
Wexler, A., & Wexler, S., with Jacobson, S. (contributor). (2015). Las Vegas, NV: Central Recovery Press. ISBN 978-1937612757.
Peter Ferentzy, Ph.D.

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health


Abstract

Rarely does a reader come across a text where integrity oozes out from between each line. That is always a treat, and Arnie and Sheila Wexler’s book is one of those. Perhaps this should not be surprising—after all, Arnie brings to the table a half-century of personal and professional experience in recovery from problem gambling (PG). In fact, as a PG scholar who has communicated with Arnie in depth over the years, I can make a claim that few in the field would disagree with: No human being has devoted more time and sweat to this cause than Arnie Wexler. The one exception, perhaps, would be his co-author and wife, Sheila Wexler. I would also be remiss if I didn’t mention Steve Jacobson, contributor, who assembled their narratives into a cohesive, beautifully written story—one in which many problem gamblers and their loved ones will recognize their own lives and struggles.

The authors use the designation “compulsive gambling” when discussing PG, which is favored by Gamblers Anonymous (GA), though generally in disuse by the scientific community. So what? “Compulsive” is just as good a word as “pathological,” “disordered,” or “problem.” Arnie is old school, and even though I disagree with him on many points (sometimes I think that Arnie and I disagree about everything), there is nothing wrong with old-school lingo, or even an old-school approach, so long as other options are present.

Arnie is an old-school gambler and an old-school tough guy, and it shows, even as he challenges ideas such as that drugs and alcohol are more dangerous than gambling. Of course, Arnie was in the game when most people thought just that, despite having a decent grasp on alcoholism and drug addiction. On page 1, Arnie lets you in on how he sees it (and how he sees himself): “I always knew I was going to be a compulsive something or other.” Yes, had the dice rolled just a little differently, maybe Arnie would be recovering from crack and booze (like this reviewer), and maybe this reviewer would have a history of compulsive gambling. No one can say for sure, and Arnie understands that truth with as much clarity as any researcher with whom I have worked.

The book is laden with sophisticated takes on complex issues (e.g., Arnie comes out as an agnostic with respect to PG etiology) and some really glaring generalizations (e.g., the “mindset” of the compulsive gambler is discussed with sweeping statements). So, on the one hand, Arnie understands how difficult it is to pin down causation and that, even if it were possible, the account would vary from one person to the next. On the other hand, he often claims that all compulsive gamblers think this way and that way. Even if many of these generalizations were true in the vast majority of cases, they could never apply to each and every one.

Let us recall, though, that the book is more experiential than scientific. Arnie often makes personal statements, and with full regard for how they are personal. So even though gamblers—according to 12-Step lore—are said to dream about yachts and such, Arnie apparently was an exception to that rule: “Most people who buy those $100 million lottery tickets enjoy a few moments daydreaming about what they’d do if they won: pay off the mortgage, buy a new house, a new car…. Not me. Nope. I just thought of paying off gambling debts and having some money left over to bet even more. That was my fantasy” (p. 8).

As gamblers go, Arnie was as pure as they come: “when I had a good day betting, I was so high I didn’t need sex” (p. 31). Sheila concurs: “Arnie wasn’t interested in making love” (p. 37). Later, she elaborates on this singular drive: “Over the years, I learned to understand the grip his addiction had on him. Even when he knew he was going to lose, he had to make a bet” (p. 40). After Arnie stopped gambling, so ended the high, and the book covers the struggles he encountered during those early years of his recovery, especially the depression. For his wife, the greatest struggle appears to have been finding the strength to forgive her husband. The two perspectives play off each other throughout the entire book, generating a dynamic that made me feel like I was a part of their reality.

Even after decades in recovery, Arnie explains how he is still an addict and therefore must always be vigilant. To illustrate, he tells the story about a time he was playing golf, and was surprised by a sign that greeted him at the second hole, advertising that a hole-in-one would win him a car. “I was shaking like a leaf as I addressed the ball. I was afraid to take a swing. I ‘accidentally’ knocked the ball off the tee, so…I was shooting for a hole in two…. I was safe” (p. 104).

This book will walk you through the world of GA in all its specificity, vis-à-vis other 12-Step programs. For example, in Alcoholics Anonymous, the fourth step involves taking a moral inventory, but in GA one needs to do a moral and financial inventory (p. 102). Arnie is not entirely uncritical of the 12-Step model, however, and freely expresses his disdain for the anonymity insisted upon by the fellowship. That statement, in itself, amounts to heresy in the 12-Step world, but Arnie feels strongly that disclosure is essential: Gamblers should stop hiding.

That’s what Arnie thinks, and he says what he thinks.

Malzberg | Arnie & Shelia Wexler discuss Arnie’s new book, “All Bets Are Off:” – YouTube

We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  
OUR NEW BOOK, GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT,
 ” ALL BETS ARE OFF”
BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON 

GAMBLING PROBLEM CALL (888) LAST BET ((888) 527-8238); WWW.ASWEXLER.COM

 

Sports betting=====.Inside peek at athletes’ thoughts on sports betting.

We poll 73 pros to get an inside peek at athletes’ thoughts on sports betting.

This story appears in ESPN The Magazine’s Feb. 16 Gambling Issue. Subscribe today!

SPORTS STARS … they’re just like us! We polled 73* NFL, NBA, NHL and MLB players on everything from their betting beliefs to weirdest wagers. One MLBer says he’ll bet on Titans-Jags “just to make the game interesting.” An NFL tight end gripes, “It’s easy to [think games are fixed] when calls don’t go your way.” And there’s the NBA star who admits to gambling $30K in one day. (OK, maybe they’re not all like us.) Point is, nearly every athlete has a story. To uncover them, you might just say we went all-in.

Should sports betting be legal?

Yes: 63 percent
No: 37 percent

Would legal sports betting challenge the integrity of your sport?

Yes: 41 percent
No: 59 percent

Have you ever had a teammate you suspected of having a gambling problem?

Yes: 37 percent
No: 63 percent

Do you ever suspect that games in your sport are fixed?

Yes: 3 percent
No: 94 percent
Maybe: 3 percent

Are you aware of point spreads?

Yes: 42 percent
No: 58 percent

Have you ever heard of an athlete in your sport being approached for information about injuries?

Yes: 10 percent
No: 90 percent

Have you ever felt that being an underdog has motivated your team so much that it was an advantage?

Yes: 75 percent
No: 25 percent

I gamble money on other sports.

Yes: 34 percent
No: 66 percent

I gamble money on other things.

Yes: 58 percent
No: 42 percent

What’s the largest amount of money you have wagered in one day?

Lowest: $0
Highest: $30,000
Average: $1,673

What’s the oddest thing you’ve ever bet on?

“We paid guys to eat skin shavings and toenail clippings.” — NFL player

“We had a snake race at my grandmother’s house. We put snakes in the grass and bet on who could make it across the yard first. You weren’t allowed to throw anything at them to make them move. It took awhile, but I ended up winning $50.” — NFL player

“We had a contest to see who could drink a gallon of milk the fastest.” — NHL player

“In college, my friends bet on who could eat 12 hard-boiled eggs.” — NBA player

“We’d put goldfish in a tank with lanes, blow a straw and watch them race. Each person picked a lane and bet on that fish.” — NFL player

“Rock-paper-scissors.” — multiple NHL players

“In college, we’d bet $20 on which bag would come out of baggage claim first.” — NBA player

“We got $76 in the minors to get our teammate to drink an entire case of pomegranate juice before batting practice. He drank 18 of the 24 bottles and threw up. We still gave him his money.” — MLB player

“I said, ‘Hey, do you want to bet if I can eat 10 hot dogs tonight?'” — NHL player

“If I could get a girl.” — Multiple NBA players

“$100 to take my shoes off and then run through a fountain in Toledo in April when there was still a sheet of ice.” — MLB player

*Not all athletes answered every question. Percentages are rounded.

Reporting By Patrick Cain, Anna Katherine Clemmons, Craig Custance, Matt Ehalt, Dan Friedell, Hallie Grossman, Doug McIntyre and Matthew Muench

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Malzberg | Arnie & Shelia Wexler discuss Arnie’s new book, “All Bets Are Off:” – YouTube

We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  
OUR NEW BOOK, GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT,
 ” ALL BETS ARE OFF”
BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON 

GAMBLING PROBLEM CALL (888) LAST BET ((888) 527-8238); WWW.ASWEXLER.COM

 

SUPER BOWL GAMBLING

BUFFALO NEWS 2/2/17

Bucky Gleason:

 Looking for a safe bet? Take gamblers calling this man after Super Bowl

This week marks the calm before the storm, as they say, a time in which Arnie Wexler can hunker down and brace for the destruction ahead. With a week off between the NFL conference championship games and the Super Bowl, gamblers had no football games to bet and therefore none to lose. Come Sunday, it will change.

Wexler knows the mind of a degenerate gambler. He was one, after all, many years ago after he started pitching pennies, shooting marbles, playing pinball and flipping baseball cards as a kid in New Jersey. He was 14 years old in 1951 when a 19-year-old woman led him into a racetrack, placed his bets and watched him win $54.

He gave back his winnings and more, of course, because that’s what compulsive gamblers do. He wasted 17 years looking for his next big score, winning just enough to rationalize another payday was around the corner, never winning enough to keep him satisfied before he darned near ruined his life.

“I thought I could be a millionaire,” Wexler said from Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., where he offers counseling and treatment to addicted gamblers, “and I was sucked in.”

Wexler, 79, hasn’t placed a bet since 1968. A decade passed before he fully resisted the urge to make a wager. It makes him a compulsive-gambling survivor.

For decades, he has held a sympathetic ear to the phone for gamblers who call his hotline (1-888-LASTBET) and need his help. Two years ago, he co-authored “All Bets are Off: Losers, Liars and Recovering from Gambling Addiction.”

He has dozens of stories about compulsive gamblers who transcend race, gender and social status, from a teenaged babysitter stealing a coin collection to desperate average Joes to former professional athletes squandering their money to a Monday Night Football executive who believed his job made him an expert.

Their accounts are all too familiar with the same basic ending, much like tales of woe that Wexler will hear in the days ahead.

“Usually, they don’t call until after the Super Bowl because everybody has this crazy dream that it’s going to bail them out for the football season,” he said. “Sometimes, it’s not until six months after because they’re waiting to get a big win, and they’re trying to turn their life around. The first week, we get bombed with calls.”

The American Gaming Association earlier this week estimated that some $4.7 billion will be wagered on the Super Bowl. The Washington-based lobby suggested 97 percent of the bets placed will be illegal. Las Vegas will account for only $132 million, a pittance compared to the overall stake.

In its view, illegal gambling is a lost opportunity for the federal government in an industry that has grown exponentially over the years. The gaming association has doubled down efforts and spent millions of dollars in hopes of lifting a federal gambling ban in place since 1992, excluding Nevada.

The general theory falls in line with Prohibition: People are betting anyway, so it might as well be taxed and regulated by the government. AGA has argued that legalizing gambling would create jobs, protect consumers and minimize offshore companies that have made billions of dollars at the expense of the United States.

“The thinking is, ‘Let’s make it legal so we can make money from it,’” Wexler said. “You look at the National Football League. Every week, they hand out an injury list. Why do they give out an injury list? Gambling, absolutely. The National Football League is the biggest gambling event for compulsive gamblers all year round.”

People can bet on just about anything involving the Super Bowl, from the over-under on Chris Hogan’s first reception (11.5 yards) to Atlanta’s Eric Weems scoring the first touchdown (66 to 1) to the over-under on the number of times “Gronk” or “Gronkowski” is mentioned during the telecast (3).

Sports writers across the country, including The Buffalo News, make weekly picks on NFL games. It’s for entertainment purposes in our case, but I’ve been told that it’s also a means of showing readers the difficulty in picking games by people who cover the sport. For evidence, look at our records.

Four of our eight writers were below .500 this season. None was over the 54 percent required to break even, including service fees, if we were actually betting on games. An editor estimated Thursday that our winning percentage is less than 20 percent when everyone picks the same team.

My worst week came after convincing myself that it would be my best. My best week came when I added up the variables, decided which teams would win and picked the opposite. Our failure rate isn’t a referendum on football knowledge. It’s proof that we shouldn’t gamble. There’s a reason Las Vegas stays in business.

This is where it gets tricky for me. I’ve long believed that casinos cause more problems than they solve. However, there’s also little disputing that billions of dollars generated from gambling could be used for other purposes, which would include anti-gambling education and assistance for people in need.

Seven years ago, the American Psychiatry Association classified pathological gambling as a disease. Other studies have identified a specific gene called the D-2 receptor that can be stimulated in certain people by such things as alcohol, drugs, sex, food and gambling. It sounds like a Super Bowl smorgasbord. That’s not a joke.

For many, it’s a fact.

But that doesn’t include everybody. I would imagine many people are casual gamblers like me. I’m in three fantasy leagues and participate in two Super Bowl pools every year. I’ve visited a few casinos, and only a few, in my lifetime. I played poker with friends years ago and have made fewer than 10 bets on individual games.

“For somebody that doesn’t have that gene, it’s no problem,” Wexler said. “They walk away. Compulsive gamblers can’t walk away.”

Alcoholism is a problem in our country, but it doesn’t mean the government should shut down liquor stores. I don’t smoke marijuana but firmly believe it should be legalized, regulated and taxed to high heaven. I’ve watched lives get ruined and families torn apart from gambling. My kids have heard dozens of lectures about gambling, how it’s just as dangerous as abusing drugs and alcohol.

“Nope, it’s worse,” Wexler said.  “Because you can’t smell it, and there’s no track marks. It’s invisible. If I was an alcoholic and came home drunk, my wife would know it. If I came home tipsy from drugs, my wife would know it. There are no telltale signs with gamblers. It’s bigger than drugs and alcohol because it’s hidden and pervasive.”

Does that mean it should be banned?

That’s the multibillion-dollar question.

My biggest beef isn’t with gambling but the hypocrisy that’s connected to gambling. New Yorkers can hit the racetrack, play Quick Draw all afternoon, buy lottery tickets and walk into a casino. All generate state revenue. But it’s illegal to bet on games partly because participants are human and, therefore, susceptible to corruption.

For some light reading, google: Albany and corruption. I’ll see you in a month.

The NFL for decades has taken an anti-gambling stance, hiding behind its mantra of preserving the “integrity of the game.” It has become laughable in recent years. The league was collecting billions of dollars in gambling-related revenue while being partnered with the likes of DraftKings and FanDuel.

Meanwhile, look at its television deals and sponsors. The league couldn’t possibly believe that adoring fans ordered the Sunday NFL Ticket because the games were so entertaining. That’s how many fantasy owners track their teams. Actual owners like Jerry Jones and Robert Kraft were among investors in DraftKings.

Fantasy sports companies were outlawed in New York until … state lawmakers figured out how to get a piece of the action. Once the finances were settled, fantasy sports were rationalized as games of chance (see: lottery) and not sports betting. In other words, you can place wagers on individual players but not teams.

“If you took away gambling from the National Football League, you have American soccer,” Wexler said. “If you put machines in every stadium seat so people could bet on the game and bet on things during the game, you wouldn’t have a seat available in any place in the NFL. That’s the two ends of the stick.”

Many will reach the end of the line Sunday. Wexler will be waiting by the phone to assess the damage. Somebody will call. At this time of year, they always do.

Malzberg | Arnie & Shelia Wexler discuss Arnie’s new book, “All Bets Are Off:” – YouTube

We need to not let our addiction define us, but have our recovery define us.  
OUR NEW BOOK, GAMBLING ADDICTION AND HOW TO RECOVER FROM IT,
 ” ALL BETS ARE OFF”
BY ARNIE AND SHEILA WEXLER AND STEVE JACOBSON 

GAMBLING PROBLEM CALL (888) LAST BET ((888) 527-8238); WWW.ASWEXLER.COM

 

Rabbi Dr. Abraham J. Twerski – The Truth about Gambling in the Jewish Community on Vimeo

 

TRUMP WEB PAGE RESPONSIBLE GAMING

FROM TRUMP WEB PAGES
Trump Entertainment Resorts
RESPONSIBLE GAMING
For most people, a visit to a casino is a form of entertainment. Guests can enjoy the wide variety of amenities available in a casino atmosphere – from gaming activities to restaurants, shopping and more. Unfortunately, for a small number of people, gaming can be a problem: a disease often referred to as compulsive or pathological gambling. It’s important to be able to identify problem gambling and know where help is available, as Trump Entertainment Resorts employees do through comprehensive training and identification programs.
To ensure responsible gambling, Trump Entertainment Resorts does everything in its power to prevent the two most common gambling problems: compulsive gambling and underage gambling. Trump employees are trained to recognize the signs of problem gambling, and offer assistance. In addition, for the safety of our guests, we monitor alcohol consumption and provide alcohol sensitivity training to appropriate employees and managers.
Trump Entertainment Resorts defines problem gambling as: Any gambling behavior negatively impacting the lives of individuals, resulting in serious personal, financial, or legal consequences.
PROBLEM GAMBLING
The following behaviors (or combination of behaviors) may indicate that an individual has a gambling problem.
•Extensive and/or frequent playing sessions, whether rated or not.
•Remaining in the gaming area without playing or after their bankroll has been exhausted.
•Regular credit increase requests.
•Excessive credit card and/or cash machine use.
•Requests to borrow money from other guests and/or staff.
•Significant changes in betting pattern.
•Losing regard to health and/or hygiene.
•Becoming desperate.
•Excessive playing in many casinos during short period of time.
•Selling, pawning or stealing items to finance gambling.
•Gambling to solve financial issues
SELF-EXCLUSION PROGRAM
If you or someone you know decides that they have a problem or have become a compulsive gambler, the New Jersey Casino Control Commission has a self-exclusion program that allows problem gamblers to exclude themselves from casino gaming activities in New Jersey for one year, for five years, or for life.
UNDERAGE GAMBLING
Trump Entertainment Resorts, has a strict policy against underage gambling. We make every reasonable attempt to prevent minors from gambling or loitering within the gaming areas.
FOR ADDITIONAL HELP
This information provides only a brief overview of the hazards associated with problem gambling. If you or someone you know needs help ask a supervisor about the many support groups in the area. Or call:
1-800-GAMBLER
(New Jersey only)
1-888-LAST-BET
(National Hotline)   WEXLERS HELP LINE
1-800-522-4700
(The National Council on Problem Gambling)
Most compulsive gamblers will answer yes to many of the following questions:
1.Do you lose time from work due to gambling?
2.Does gambling make you insensitive to the welfare of your family, thus making your home life unhappy?
3.Have you ever felt remorse after gambling?
4.Have you ever gambled to solve financial difficulties or sold personal property to finance gambling?
5.After winning or losing, do you feel like you must return as soon as possible?
6.Do you often gamble until your last dollar is gone?
7.Do you ever borrow to finance your gambling?
8.Have you ever committed, or considered committing an illegal act to finance gambling?
9.Do arguments, disappointments, frustration, even good fortune give you an urge to gamble?
10.Have you ever considered self-destruction a result of your gambling?
These questions from Gamblers Anonymous spotlight common behaviors of problem gamblers, but by no means provide a diagnosis of problem gambling. If you would like more information, please contact The National Council on Problem Gambling.
*This material was prepared in consultation with Arnie and Shelia Wexler Associates.
Content © Copyright 2016 Trump Entertainment Resorts  |  Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER
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